Dream More, Learn More, Do More & Become More

“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.” - John Quincy Adams

It is true that great leaders inspire their people to reach higher, dream bigger, and achieve greater. The most important leadership skill that we can develop is the ability to provide inspiration to our team. If we inspire them to reach for the stars, they just might bring us back the moon.

Our main management task as educational leaders is to inspire teachers to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, just like Adams suggests. It is clear that our Teacher Supervisors’ roles as coaches, mentors and leaders do inspire teachers to learn more during their coaching sessions. As a result, teachers are able to do more and become more competent in their teaching. Once teachers are inspired to learn more and do more, their respective students are likely to learn more, do more and achieve more.

Petros Banda, Teacher Supervisor in Katete West, distinguishes himself by his passion, focus and commitment towards the achievement and the learning of his teachers. His commitment is an essential element of a successful education leader. He learns more about his teachers and is always committed and concerned with the development of these teachers. Petros cultivates his teachers’ curiosity and interest to learn by providing a one-on-one lesson demonstration in areas where teachers struggles most. He endeavors to learn new ways and techniques of coaching to fulfill his responsibilities to the teachers. He is very open minded to new ideas and once he get to understand the concepts, he goes above and beyond his prescribed duties to help the teachers help the learners to learn more.

Petros Banda

Petros Banda

We are therefore all challenged to dream big, learn always, do more and achieve greater as we enable the students realize their potential. I’d encourage you all to find time to learn more and do more in your daily work endeavors!

-Amos

Head of Academics